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Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Rotation length and repeated harvesting influence Populus coppice production found in the catalog.

Rotation length and repeated harvesting influence Populus coppice production

Terry F Strong

Rotation length and repeated harvesting influence Populus coppice production

by Terry F Strong

  • 189 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station in [Saint Paul, Minn.?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Coppice forests -- United States -- Harvesting,
  • Crop rotation -- United States

  • Edition Notes

    StatementTerry Strong
    SeriesResearch note NC -- 350, Research note NC -- 350
    ContributionsNorth Central Forest Experiment Station (Saint Paul, Minn.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination4 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14696049M

    This study describes production and growth of the second rotation of 17 poplar (Populus spp.) clones in a short rotation coppice culture (SRC). In addition, the link with leaf characteristics was studied. In April , an experimental field plantation w cuttings ha-1 was established on a former waste disposal site. In December , January and February , all stools were Cited by: Fifth Central Hardwood Conf. Ap , Urbana-Champaign, IL. pp. (). D. S. DeBell, G. W, Clendensen and J. C. Zasada, Growing Populus biomass: comparison of woodgrass versus wider-spaced short-rotation systems. Biomass and Bioenergy (in press). T. Strong, Rotation length and repeated harvesting influence Populus coppice by:

      A video compilation of the harvest demonstration of a 4 year old short rotation coppice plantation. The trees were harvested using a New Holland corn combine harvester, with a . Rotation Length and Repeated Harvesting Influences Populus Coppice Production. Research Note NC St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station Strong, Terry. Rotation Length and Repeated Harvesting Influence Populus Coppice Production. Research Note NC St. Paul, MN: U.S. Dept.

    Below-ground characteristics of five Populus clones, belonging to different species and parentages, were studied during the second growing season of the third rotation of a high-density coppice culture. Size (length, area and volume), biomass, nitrogen and carbon concentrations of three classes of fine roots (diameter classes of , and mm) were determined for four different soil Cited by: Ground damage caused by Short Rotation Coppice harvesting machinery may affect crop yields over the c 25 year life span of the stools. Fieldwork has shown that machines will cause soil compaction and rutting within the crop area. Damage is influenced by both the weight of machinery and the number of passes made over the ground. Limited growth.


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Rotation length and repeated harvesting influence Populus coppice production by Terry F Strong Download PDF EPUB FB2

_) UnitedStates Departmentof Agriculture Rotation Length and Repeated Harvesting Forest Service Influence Populus Coppice Production NorthCentral ForestExperiment Station Terry Strong ResearchNoteNC.

ABSTRACTAcoPpiceand a first-rotationstand of bar, fertilizedannually with kgN/ha, and. Get this from a library. Rotation length and repeated harvesting influence Populus coppice production.

[Terry F Strong; North Central Forest Experiment Station (Saint Paul, Minn.)]. A coppice and a first-rotatioin stand of hybrid poplar barely differed in biomass yields beyond age 4. Repeated harvesting of coppice stands under short rotation reduced yields. Rotation Length and Repeated Harvesting Influences Populus Coppice ProductionCited by: The optimum rotation period or harvesting cycle for biomass production when applying coppice regeneration is species specific and affected by stand density.

For dense plantations of bush-like willows the suggested coppicing cycles are between 3 and 6 years [28], [29], [32], for alder and hybrid poplar between 5 and 15 years [23], [25], and for aspen preferably more than 15 years [26].Cited by: Vitality of the oldest Czech short rotation coppice with poplar clone Max-4 (Populus nigra × Populus maximowiczii) can be evaluated as good after 15 years regardless of rotation length (in the experiment 1- 3- and 6-year), which influenced biomass yields significantly.

For commercial use of this poplar clone, a 5–6-year rotation can be recommended as more yield beneficial than shorter rotations, but Cited by: 6. Strong T. Rotation length and repeated harvesting in uence Populus coppice production.

Forest Service North Central Experimental Station. Research Note NC, In Europe, farmers prefer the very Short Rotation Coppice (vSRC) cultivation model, with a very high plant density (–14, p ha−1) and a harvesting cycle of 1–4 years; while in Italy.

Mechanised harvesting of short-rotation coppices Article (PDF Available) in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews September with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'. research on the mechanisation of harvesting and comminution (chipping) of short rotation coppice, paralleled by work on storage and drying.

Technical Development Branch (TDB) of the Forestry Commission was engaged on the harvesting and chipping aspects of the programme while Silsoe Research Institute carried out the work on storage and drying. 1) Repeated crops without planting 2) Increased growth rates allows volume production on limited land base 3) Short cycle provides quick return on investment 4) Excellent for pulpwood/biomass 5) Can be used to remove heavy metals and other toxic substances from soil.

The harvesting of wood species intended for energy production is one of the critical steps for the establishment of an economically viable supply chain. The review examines the state of the art of the main systems for collecting the short rotation coppice (SRC) by referring to poplar (Populus spp.), one of the main energy species for southern Cited by: that have to be re-planted after harvest.

Therefore, the abbreviation SRC is used throughout the handbook for both, short rotation woody crops and short rotation coppice. Figure 1: „Traditional coppice“ as it was a frequent management practice in the past for e.g. willows (in.

Biomass yield and energy balance of a short-rotation poplar coppice with multiple clones on degraded land during 16 Available via license: CC BY-NC-SA Content may be subject to. Harvesting to Get a Eucalyptus Coppice Crop1 Thomas F Geary2 When eucalyptus trees are felled, new stems often grow from the stumps to produce another crop of trees.

This new crop is called the coppice crop to distinguish it from the seed-ling crop. Coppice crops can be important in growing eucalypts profitably. Replanting costsCited by: 1. Rotation length and repeated harvesting influence Populous coppice production [Forest service, research note NC] T Strong Economic sustainability of early potato production in the.

CiteSeerX - Document Details (Isaac Councill, Lee Giles, Pradeep Teregowda): The objective of this review is to compare the cost of coppice and longer rotation poplar harvesting technology.

Harvesting technology for short rotation poplar has evolved over the years to address both coppice harvest and single-stem harvest systems. Two potential approaches for coppice harvesting are modified. Strong T () Rotation length and repeated harvesting influence Populus coppice production.

Research Note NC, North Central Experimental Station, USDA Forest Service, St. Paul, MN, USA, pp. GscholarCited by:   This video was taken by WIT Forest Research team during field studies of machine productivity in short rotation coppice (SRC) Willow harvesting operations in Dunhill, Co.

Waterford. promising option for sustainable production of biofuels in agriculture and it may help to secure the income of farmers. Therefore, cultivation of fast growing trees (short rotation coppice – SRC), such as poplars (Populus sp.), willow (Salix viminalis), and black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) is of increasing interest.

In many European. Short rotation coppice (SRC) harvesting techniques are available in Germany, but broad experience and knowledge about machine performance and the related effective costs of harvesting operations are still missing. This information is crucial, as harvesting costs strongly influence the economic performance of the overall supply chain.

Therefore, it was the aim of this study to collect and Cited by:. Auclair D, Bouvarel L () Influence of spacing and short rotations on Populus trichocarpa × deltoides coppice.

Can J For Res – doi: /x CrossRef Google Scholar Baltaxe R () Air flow patterns in the lee of model by: In total, o roots were measured on coppice stools.

The rotation length, species and stool location within a block were all found to influence the maximum size of root produced. Soil type had some influence on the root number and depth, but the pattern of root distribution down the soil profile was similar for both by: T.

Strong, “Rotation length and repeated harvesting influence on Populus coppice production,” Tech. Rep. NCUSDA Forest Service, North Central Forest Cited by: 7.